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21 02, 2019

Hiking in Broken Bow, Oklahoma

2019-10-22T21:58:05+00:00Attractions, Beavers Bend, Beavers Bend Creative Escapes, Nature, Outdoor Activity, River activity, Things to do, Uncategorized, Wildlife|

With such breathtaking surroundings, miles of trails, and landscapes that are perfect for journeying through nature, hiking in Broken Bow should be on every outdoor lover’s bucket list. When you stay at Beavers Bend Creative Escapes, lace up your hiking boots and get ready to embark on an epic adventure. Incredible natural areas such as Broken Bow Lake and Beavers Bend State Park surround our cabins in Oklahoma, and they are waiting for you to discover them. An Experience For Everyone No matter what level of experience you have with hiking, you can find the perfect trail to fit your [...]

18 10, 2018

Oklahoma’s McCurtain County Wilderness Area A Natural Beauty

2019-10-22T22:13:02+00:00Attractions, Beavers Bend Creative Escapes, Broken Bow, Fishing, McCurtain County, Nature, Wildlife|

The shortleaf pine and hardwood forest is the largest virgin forest of its kind in the United States. That’s just one of the things that makes McCurtain County Wilderness Area (MCWA) not just an Oklahoma treasure, but a national one too. You’ll find the MCWA, the oldest wildlife area in Oklahoma, in the northern part of McCurtain County, adjacent to Broken Bow Reservoir and Ouachita National Forest. The area was created from a 1918 purchase, costing about $6.13 an acre. In the 1930’s the Works Progress Administration (WPA) constructed a bridge across the Upper Mountain Fork River and installed more [...]

5 07, 2018

Southeast Oklahoma’s Red Slough Wildlife Area

2019-10-22T22:17:57+00:00Beavers Bend Creative Escapes, Cabins, Fishing, Nature, Outdoor Activity, Wildlife|

Spanning nearly 8,000 acres, the Red Slough Wildlife Management Area (RSWMA)is a successful project that has enhanced wildlife and recreation in the area southeast of Broken Bow, Oklahoma. In the late 1960, this Red Slough area was cleared and drained for agricultural use, eliminating wetlands that helped maintain a natural flood cycle. In 1997, landowner Philip Hogan placed more than 5,800 acres into the Wetlands Reserve Program administered by the National Resources Service (NRCS). In the following years, additional acres were added, increasing the expanse of the project. Then in 2003-4, the Red Slough Wildlife Management Area received a grant [...]

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